Use Video to Boost Halftime Adjustments and Maximize Intermission

Making adjust­ments at half­time is crit­i­cal to a team’s suc­cess, and video has a big impact on the process.

Use Video to Boost Halftime Adjustments and Maximize Intermission

Making adjust­ments at half­time is crit­i­cal to a team’s suc­cess, and video has a big impact on the process.

Andy Peat is the video analy­sis coach for the Vancouver Whitecaps. In this four-part blog series, Peat will describe how the Whitecaps’ pro­gram uses video and how vital it is to its success.

Just 15 min­utes sep­a­rate the con­clu­sion of the first half and the begin­ning of the sec­ond — a short, but impor­tant peri­od. In this small win­dow, the coach­ing staff needs to com­pact all their opin­ions, feel­ings and obser­va­tions into clear mes­sages for the play­ers to apply in the sec­ond half. 

Analysts have an impor­tant role in max­i­miz­ing this time peri­od. They must have data to rein­force the coach­es’ mes­sages. This includes:

  • Tactical video clips linked to the game strategy
  • Statistics show­ing suc­cess or weakness
  • Individual clips for spe­cif­ic players
  • Statistical print­outs
  • Still images

The impact of ana­lysts’ data can be very pro­found. The Whitecaps posi­tion the analy­sis team at mid­field with a wide-angle cam­era to cap­ture and code dur­ing the first half. The code footage is fil­tered into spe­cif­ic themes and moments that are pre­sent­ed to the coach­es with sum­ma­rized notes.

Video is just one strat­e­gy, but it often has the great­est impact. It’s used as an infor­ma­tive method to trig­ger an imme­di­ate response based on the tac­tics of the game, oppo­si­tion changes, strengths and weak­ness­es. Each match and half­time is dif­fer­ent, which makes com­mu­ni­ca­tion between the ana­lyst and coach­ing staff crucial.

The impact of video will vary based on the trust between the ana­lysts and the coach­es. A key piece of an analyst’s job is know­ing what the coach­es will want to see and hav­ing it ready for them. With Hudl’s tools, they can cap­ture the footage and cre­ate a cod­ing process to allow for a quick sum­ma­ry of the match.

We’re not rein­vent­ing the wheel here — this is com­mon prac­tice in many pro­fes­sion­al and nation­al envi­ron­ments around the world. Manchester City’s analy­sis depart­ment released a short video with insights into their match day workflow.

The key points for analysts:

  • Build a strong rela­tion­ship with the head coach so you can under­stand what will be need­ed at halftime.
  • Know the strat­e­gy so you can stay focused on the tac­ti­cal play.
  • Know what you can pro­vide in both home and away environments.
  • Always have a back­up plan in case of tech­nol­o­gy fail­ure or error.
  • Be clear and con­cise in your communication.
  • Understand the chang­ing lock­er room dynam­ic and gauge the mood to decide what you need to pro­vide for the coaches.

Check out Andy’s oth­er arti­cles on how video helps the Vancouver Whitecaps find success.

How to Effectively Use Hudl at Every Level of a Soccer Club

Trickle-Down Effect: How Video Drives Development for Whitecaps FC