4 Ways Video Analysis Will Help You Win More Games

Be bet­ter pre­pared to win more games with a clos­er look at indi­vid­ual and team performance.

4 Ways Video Analysis Will Help You Win More Games

Be bet­ter pre­pared to win more games with a clos­er look at indi­vid­ual and team performance.

Video analy­sis has been wide­ly adopt­ed by teams at the high­est lev­el of com­pe­ti­tion, giv­ing them insights that fuel team and play­er devel­op­ment and bet­ter pre­pares them for the oppo­si­tion. A new gen­er­a­tion of video analy­sis tools are mak­ing these game chang­ing insights avail­able to teams at all levels. 

Here are four ways you can use video analy­sis to help your team win more games:

Let Video Be Your Eyes

No mat­ter how obser­vant you are, it’s impos­si­ble to see every­thing on the pitch from the side­lines, and it can be tough to remem­ber every­thing you saw post-game. Jonathan Branch, who coach­es at Oxford High School (Miss.) said, a lot of times I think I see some­thing on the field, but when I can go back and review the film and make notes on it, I can real­ly see what we’re doing wrong. That has helped me become such a bet­ter coach.”

Reviewing game video will unlock game-chang­ing insights that you and your staff can use to pre­pare for the next matchup.

Video Is the Ultimate Teaching Tool

It can be tough to get your coach­ing points across in a way that play­ers will remem­ber come game time. I can tell one of my wings that I want him to cut across the mid­dle when the ball is on the oppo­site side. It kind of makes sense to him just hear­ing it. But when he can see that run and see how open it would be, it helps tremen­dous­ly,” said Coach Branch. 

The visu­al ele­ments of learn­ing have been stud­ied by researchers at the University of Iowa. They found that we want to assume stu­dents, in this case ath­letes, will remem­ber every­thing we say. But if you real­ly want some­thing to be mem­o­rable you may need to include a visu­al or hands-on expe­ri­ence, in addi­tion to audi­to­ry information.” 

When you use video as a coach­ing tool, you can take those men­tal or ver­bal notes that you’ve made and attach them direct­ly to the real plays that mat­ter most. You then take those notes and share them direct­ly with the groups that you think need to study them.

Coach Branch even has his play­ers do the analy­sis. I let them kind of run the thing and say, You tell me what went wrong.’ They’re tak­ing the ini­tia­tive. They’re start­ing to see the game in a whole dif­fer­ent sense.”

He went on to add, By the fourth or fifth ses­sion, they were all pay­ing atten­tion, say­ing, Coach Branch, can you stop it here. This is what you did wrong here.’ They’re pick­ing up the whole aspect of the game we’ve been try­ing to teach them. It makes them bet­ter soc­cer play­ers and teammates.”

#Protip: Have your posi­tion coach­es break down games as it relates to their spe­cif­ic ath­letes. Have your goal­keep­ers coach find the plays that relate to his keep­ers, and have him cre­ate a playlist with notes and draw­ings to share with the keep­ers directly.

“[If] you real­ly want some­thing to be mem­o­rable you may need to include a visu­al or hands-on experience…” Amy Poremba, Associate Professor - University of Iowa

Improve Team Chemistry Through Highlights

Celebrating accom­plish­ments togeth­er is a proven way to build team chem­istry. Use your video review ses­sions to high­light per­son­al and team wins. Spend a few min­utes con­grat­u­lat­ing play­ers who demon­strat­ed per­son­al growth. You can even ask you team to call out moments that are worth revis­it­ing.
 
#ProTip: Your team’s high­lights should be immor­tal­ized on your team pro­file. Not only is it fun for your team to relive those spe­cial moments, but friends and fam­i­ly will be able to join in.

Understand the Strengths and Weaknesses of Your Opponent

Preparation isn’t com­plete with­out know­ing your opponent’s strengths and weak­ness­es. Reviewing video of your oppo­nents will allow you to iden­ti­fy ten­den­cies that you can use to devel­op a game plan. Take this a step fur­ther by break­ing down that video into playlists with notes for your team to study. By dis­sect­ing every aspect of their game, you and your team will be bet­ter pre­pared come game time. 

#Protip: Have your play­ers break down an opponent’s game and cre­ate a playlist to present in your next film review ses­sion. Not only will they show the rest of the team what they saw on film, it holds them account­able to be pre­pared for the next opponent.

Smarter soc­cer starts with video analy­sis. You can learn more about Hudl and its tools by sub­scrib­ing to our free month­ly newslet­ter. It cov­ers fea­ture updates, team close-ups, and expert tips on improv­ing performance.