College Coaches Maximize the Power of Video — Now It’s Your Turn

We caught up with some of the top coach­ing minds to dis­cov­er how video has changed their programs.

College Coaches Maximize the Power of Video — Now It’s Your Turn

We caught up with some of the top coach­ing minds to dis­cov­er how video has changed their programs.

Video has recent­ly explod­ed in col­lege ath­let­ics — most pro­grams have ded­i­cat­ed sev­er­al staff mem­bers sole­ly to record­ing, break­ing down and dis­trib­ut­ing video. Any team not using video risks get­ting left behind.

Your orga­ni­za­tion may not have the mas­sive bud­gets or seem­ing­ly-end­less staffs of col­leges, but this doesn’t dimin­ish the impor­tance of video. 

John Cook, Nebraska volleyball head coach

Video is huge for us,” Mark Turgeon, the head men’s bas­ket­ball coach at Maryland, said. We use it in a vari­ety of ways, whether it’s teach­ing our team, teach­ing indi­vid­ual play­ers or putting togeth­er scout­ing reports. We watch a lot of video. It’s para­mount for what we’re try­ing to accom­plish as a bas­ket­ball program.”

We com­piled a few tips from the pros to show­case video’s pow­er and help new adopters get started.

Break the Team into Small Groups

The term film ses­sion” brings to mind images of an entire team packed into a room watch­ing one screen as a coach lec­tures. While these meet­ings have val­ue, play­ers might receive more rel­e­vant infor­ma­tion when addressed in seg­ment­ed groups or one-on-one sessions.

We do a lot of video ses­sions with spe­cif­ic groups,” Texas men’s bas­ket­ball coach Shaka Smart said. There might be three or four guys in our point guard group. Those guys are watch­ing a lot of video togeth­er with a posi­tion coach or maybe with me as a head coach.”

Brandon Gilliam, head coach of the nation­al cham­pi­on BYU men’s soc­cer team, agrees. If you break the game into small­er, tar­get­ed chunks, ath­letes are more like­ly to absorb your lessons.

Brandon Gilliam, Head coach of the national champion BYU men's soccer team

Watch Right before Practice

Illustrating your point right before hit­ting the court or pitch will ensure its impact. This lim­its the space between hear­ing your instruc­tions and putting them into action, mak­ing your guid­ance much stickier.

Take 10 – 15 min­utes before prac­tice to show video of pos­i­tive moments and things to work on. As your next con­test approach­es, share clips of your opponent’s most pop­u­lar plays or sets to famil­iar­ize ath­letes with what they’re about to face. 

This is a com­mon prac­tice for many col­lege teams. If your ath­letes learn this process ear­ly on, they’ll have a great chance of suc­cess at the next level.

Brandon Gilliam, Head coach of the national champion BYU men's soccer team

Keep Things Positive

While video plays a piv­otal role in cor­rect­ing mis­takes, your ath­letes could grow to resent it and tune it out if you only show flaws. To keep their atten­tion, throw them a few bones, too.

Nebraska vol­ley­ball coach John Cook shows five pos­i­tive plays for every teach­ing moment. Highlighting good per­for­mance not only devel­ops a bond between coach­es and play­ers, but it also cre­ates pos­i­tive mus­cle mem­o­ry and keeps your audi­ence engaged.

Shaka Smart, Texas men's basketball coach

These are just a few ways video can make a major dif­fer­ence. And it’s not only for col­lege and pro­fes­sion­al coach­es — this pow­er is avail­able to you, too. See how Hudl can change your pro­gram.