Video Helped Fuel BYU Soccer’s Championship Run 

Coach Brandon Gilliam used video to recre­ate game sit­u­a­tions in prac­tice, fix mis­takes quick­ly and rein­force pos­i­tive behavior.

Video Helped Fuel BYU Soccer’s Championship Run 

Coach Brandon Gilliam used video to recre­ate game sit­u­a­tions in prac­tice, fix mis­takes quick­ly and rein­force pos­i­tive behavior.

Sometimes it hits Brandon Gilliam dur­ing a game and he makes a men­tal note to him­self. Sometimes the real­iza­tion comes lat­er, when the BYU head coach is review­ing his team’s per­for­mance on video.

While Gilliam con­tends last year’s squad was one of the most con­nect­ed groups he’s coached dur­ing his nine years as part of the staff, he still noticed instances of play­ers momen­tar­i­ly falling out of the team’s cohe­sive nature. BYU’s team­work was key to win­ning the nation­al title, so Gilliam worked quick­ly to smooth out any loss of focus.

A lot of times a play­er is going to con­cen­trate on his role and for­get how his role impacts the guy in front of him,” Gilliam said. But dur­ing those ear­ly-sea­son ses­sions when they’re all engaged and they’re in a room togeth­er and you’re talk­ing about who needs to slide where and the pur­pose behind where they need to move and how it affects oth­ers, now they start think­ing more about how the whole back line togeth­er con­nect­ed to the midfield. 

Changing your shape by a cou­ple steps can make a mas­sive dif­fer­ence between pre­vent­ing a shot or a goal, and that’s the mind­set we got them in ear­ly on.”

Sharing videos with players allows them to learn on their own time.

Gilliam ironed out mis­takes by recre­at­ing game sit­u­a­tions in prac­tice. He would watch a game, cut it into a few key clips, then send them to the player(s). At the next day’s prac­tice, he’d put the play­ers in a very sim­i­lar sit­u­a­tion to what he saw on the video, walk­ing them through what should have transpired.

Because the ath­letes had watched the video Gilliam sent them the night before, they came in with a base knowl­edge of what need­ed to be cor­rect­ed. Cracks in exe­cu­tion were quick­ly sewn up.

You’ll explain some­thing to them and they think that they get it, but then they go out and they make the same mis­take because they just can’t visu­al­ize the infor­ma­tion you’ve giv­en them,” Gilliam said. 

Then you send them the video and talk to them about it again, and they’ll imme­di­ate­ly under­stand exact­ly what you’re try­ing to get at.”

But Gilliam doesn’t only use the video to call out play­ers’ errors. He also finds clips of pos­i­tive moments and shares those with his play­ers as well. Not only does this boost the ath­letes’ con­fi­dence and reward pos­i­tive behav­ior, but it helps cre­ate a mutu­al respect between play­er and coach.

Catch a record­ing of our live class with Gilliam to learn more about using video to max­i­mize prac­tice and cre­ate game-like scenarios.