Four Common Mistakes Athletes Make in the Offseason

Getting bet­ter is nev­er easy (and it shouldn’t be, right?) but these com­mon mis­takes can make off­sea­son train­ing even hard­er than it needs to be.

Four Common Mistakes Athletes Make in the Offseason

Getting bet­ter is nev­er easy (and it shouldn’t be, right?) but these com­mon mis­takes can make off­sea­son train­ing even hard­er than it needs to be.

Fierce ath­letes know there’s noth­ing off” about the off­sea­son – those weeks and months are all about prepar­ing to come back bet­ter and stronger than the last time you com­pet­ed. Getting bet­ter is nev­er easy (and it shouldn’t be, right?) but these com­mon mis­takes can make off­sea­son train­ing even hard­er than it needs to be.

4. Flying solo

One of the smartest things ath­letes can do to improve in the off­sea­son is take up anoth­er sport. Get an extra work­out by join­ing a rec league on top of your gym time, or go out for anoth­er one of your high school’s teams. Challenging your body in new ways, along­side oth­er ath­letes, will boost your ath­leti­cism and pro­vide valu­able tools for your pri­ma­ry sport.

3. Failing to plan

When left to your own devices, it’s easy to float from one exer­cise to the next. But as long as you’re sweat­ing and feel­ing the burn you’re doing good work, right? Maybe not.

A big dif­fer­ence between work­ing out” and real­ly train­ing is estab­lish­ing a plan and stick­ing to it. Finding a con­sis­tent train­ing sched­ule that works for you will make work­outs more effec­tive and remove any guess­work. Coaches and per­son­al train­ers are great resources for this kind of sched­ule, so def­i­nite­ly hit em up.

2. Missing the point

Offseason train­ing should be about becom­ing a bet­ter ath­lete. While your bench or ver­ti­cal might increase, your focus needs to be broad­er. Focus on over­all improve­ment, using your work­outs to become stronger, more agile and bet­ter con­di­tioned. Focusing on ath­leti­cism will help those sport-spe­cif­ic skills in the long run.

1. Not tracking progress

Improvement takes time, and you won’t always real­ize progress as it hap­pens – unless you’re keep­ing track. You’re bound to notice some tan­gi­ble strides, like gained or lost pounds, but you may miss the more sub­tle dif­fer­ences like changes in your form, pow­er and over­all performance.

Take an inven­to­ry of your skills when you begin a train­ing pro­gram so you have some­thing for a com­par­i­son halfway through, and again when you’re fin­ished. Use Hudl Technique to record your­self at the out­set of a pro­gram, and you can check out your progress with side-by-side videos. The self-com­par­i­son and slow-motion play­back make sub­tle improve­ments easy to spot. You might sur­prise your­self with how far you’ve come.

Download Hudl Technique for free.