College Coaches Want to See Development – Start with Highlights

The vol­ley­ball recruit­ing space can be a tough road to nav­i­gate. These coach­es offer advice to cap­i­tal­ize on this spring’s club match­es to get ath­letes noticed.

College Coaches Want to See Development – Start with Highlights

The vol­ley­ball recruit­ing space can be a tough road to nav­i­gate. These coach­es offer advice to cap­i­tal­ize on this spring’s club match­es to get ath­letes noticed.

There are hun­dreds of teams with thou­sands of ath­letes play­ing in tour­na­ments across the coun­try every week­end. The envi­ron­ment isn’t con­ducive to get­ting noticed by recruiters, many of whom arrive with a set list of ath­letes they’re going to watch.

Instead of get­ting lost in the crowd, your ath­letes can lever­age tour­na­ment match­es to cre­ate high­lights that’ll help recruiters see them before they arrive on-site at the next tournament.

Our friends at Locker Room Talk asked col­lege coach­es what they look for in a high­light — they passed along the best bits for us to share with you.

Keep It Updated

Let’s start off by stat­ing that high­lights in and of them­selves aren’t going to get you a schol­ar­ship. No coach sees a high­light and imme­di­ate­ly offers a play­er. But they play a huge role in get­ting your name in front those col­lege coach­es you want to play for. So it’s impor­tant that you have one ready to send when the time comes. 

Your club will play mul­ti­ple match­es every week­end for months. As an ath­lete, that means hun­dreds of plays every week­end eli­gi­ble for a high­light. So it’s impor­tant ath­letes don’t just cre­ate one after the first tour­na­ment and call it a day.

Ball State head coach Kelli Miller sug­gests con­tin­u­al­ly edit­ing high­lights. Having a con­sis­tent video is impor­tant to show pro­gres­sion so I’d sug­gest updat­ing it or send­ing out new film about once a month or after a big tour­na­ment,” she said.

Updates gives coach­es the oppor­tu­ni­ty to see ath­letes against dif­fer­ent com­pe­ti­tion, but it also shows how ath­letes have devel­oped and grown over the season.

Email with updates and new video once every oth­er month,” Greg Goral, head coach at Campbell University, said. Show progression.”

Make it Personal

Once you have a list of clips ready to send, it’s crit­i­cal to start build­ing a rela­tion­ship. Coaches are busy — ded­i­cat­ing time to some­one who isn’t invest­ed in their pro­gram is a lost cause. Be sure your ath­letes stand out when they con­tact coach­es. You have to teach them how to inter­act with these coaches. 

Tell us about your­self, who you play for, your trav­el sched­ule and how you did in the fall with your high school team,” University of West Alabama head coach Alexis Meeks said. We love emails and encour­age kids to fol­low schools they real­ly like on social media. Best way to get information.”

Doug Porterfield, head coach at Roberts Wesleyan College, agrees con­tact and estab­lish­ing a rela­tion­ship is the key to the recruit­ing process. The best way is to show me that you are inter­est­ed. No form emails cre­at­ed by your recruit­ing pro­file page,” he said. You want the coach to remem­ber you beyond the conversion.”

Let the Camera Roll

Almost all of the coach­es they talked with agreed it’s impor­tant to see entire plays unfold, not just the lit­tle bit a spe­cif­ic athlete’s involved in. 

Sending recruit­ing pack­ages through Hudl allows coach­es access to those full plays. Coaches eval­u­ate more than just skill — they’re look­ing for good team­mates and ath­letes who will fit in with their culture.

I pre­fer un-edit­ed game film,” Dale Starr, head coach at Robert Morris University, said. “[It] doesn’t have to be a full match, but I want to see reac­tions to good plays and bad plays. How you inter­act with team­mates, body lan­guage, etc. Anyone can be made to look great in a high­light film.”

Krista Cobb, head coach at Ohio Wesleyan, explained she wants see a com­plete pic­ture. We want to see your move­ments pri­or to the play so we can eval­u­ate your train­ing and how you are get­ting your results,” Cobb said.

College coach­es want to see an athlete’s devel­op­ment, and they want to hear direct­ly from them. Teach your ath­letes to take own­er­ship of the recruit­ing process — have them reach out with a per­son­al­ized email telling recruiters why they’re a good fit for their pro­gram. If they throw in an updat­ed high­light link, made with these tips from col­lege coach­es, they’ll be set up for suc­cess.