Men's Lacrosse | Breakdowns and Reports

Learn more about how our analysts tag your games and the reports we return.

Hudl Assist follows the rules and statistician manual of NCAA sports

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Face-Offs


Face-Off

Credit the face-off to the team that gains clear possession of the ball and can perform the normal functions of the possession, not based on the possession that is called by the referee.

Face-Off Won

If player A1 and opponent B1 face-off, and A1 wins the faceoff and picks up the ball, credit A1 with a faceoff win and a ground ball.

If player A1 and opponent B1 face-off, and teammate A2 is the first player to get clear possession, credit A1 with a faceoff win and A2 with a ground ball.

Face-Off Loss

Based on the example above, we will credit B1 with a Face-Off Loss.

Things to Note:

  • The player, of the team that wins the faceoff, who starts in the center of the circle (FOGO) will be credited with the face-off win
  • Due to the video angle/quality face-offs may be tagged as “unknown” athletes
  • The NCAA Staticians manual does not call out face-off Loss. This is credited to the FOGO on the opposing team who gains possession from the face-off

Face-Off Violation

Before either team can obtain the faceoff, a player on either team is charged with a foul or violation. Credit the Official Men’s Lacrosse Statistics Rules 5 offended team with the face-off if one team gets the ball. In the case of a double foul, or any other violation requiring a reface of the ball, wait to credit the faceoff until the play is complete.

Offense


Goals

A goal should be credited to the player who shot the ball, scoring a goal for his own team. In certain situations, a team goal (also known as “own goal”) may be credited. However, statisticians should err on the side of awarding the goal to the player who took the original shot.

Things to Note:

  • A shot that strikes another offensive player and deflects into the goal will be credited to the player who last touched the ball before it enters the goal. This can be tough to see.
  • A ball entering the goal that appeared to have been a pass to another player shall be counted as a shot and a goal for the player who made the pass.
  • A team goal will be credited if the opposing team gains possession and then causes the ball to enter their own goal.
  • Due to camera angle/quality goals may be tagged as “unknown athletes”.

Assists

An assist is not necessarily credited to a player who makes a pass before a goal. There should be a conscious effort on the part of the passer to find an open player for a shot or to help a player work free for a shot.

Things to Note:

  • An assist is subjective and may be marked differently from a coach's expectations.
  • There is no particular time frame for an assist,
  • The pass and shot will appear to be part of the same play.
  • An assist should not be credited on a play when the goal scorer dodges a defensive player after receiving the pass.
  • Due to camera angle/quality goals may be tagged as “unknown athletes”.

Shots

A ball propelled toward the goal by an offensive player shall be called a shot. The ball may be thrown from a stick, kicked, or otherwise physically directed to be credited as a shot.

Things to Note:

  • A ball that enters the goal propelled by the offensive team must then become a shot and a goal.
  • In the case of a team goal (also known as an own goal), there is no shot recorded.
  • Due to camera angle/quality goals may be missed.

Defense


Blocks

A blocked shot by a defenseman is not considered a save unless the defenseman is in the crease and the goalie is not.

Things to Note:

  • A block is credited to the defenseman who stops the ball from going into the goal.
  • The defenseman can be outside of the goal crease to be credited with a block.
  • The defenseman can be inside the goal crease and be credited with a block as long as the goalie is also in the crease.
  • Due to camera angle/quality blocked shots may be missed.

Saves

The basic rule of a save is that any time a ball is stopped or deflected with any part of the goalie’s body or stick, which if not stopped or deflected would have resulted in the ball entering the goal, a save is recorded. There are no empty-net goals awarded. Every goal scored must be credited against a goalkeeper of record.

Things to Note:

  • Due to video angle/quality saves may be missed.
  • Only goalies can be credited with saves

Possessions


Ground Balls

Any ball not in possession of either team that comes into possession of either team should result in a ground ball once a player establishes possession and is immediately able to perform the normal functions of possession (i.e., shoot, pass, cradle), provided the ball was contested by both teams before establishing possession. A ground ball could be awarded even if no opposing player is within a considerable distance of the player when he gets possession of the ball.

Things to Note:

  • Ground balls are subjective and what one coach considers a ground ball another will not.
  • Due to video angle/quality ground balls may be missed.

Clears

College

A clearing attempt is defined with the defensive team in possession of the ball below the restraining line. The ball must cross the plane of midfield at the 60-second mark. The ball only needs to be across midfield at that time to satisfy the clearing rule, not be in the offensive team’s possession at that point. For purposes of a successful clear, however, the ball must be across the line at the 60-second mark and then the offensive team must either have possession or gain possession before the defense. The only three ways a successful clear can be awarded in the first 20 seconds of the shot clock: if the offensive team takes possession of the ball below the restraining line and 1) scores a goal in the first 20 seconds, 2) takes a shot that resets the shot clock within the first 20 seconds or 3) takes a shot that results in a change of possession in the first 20 seconds, either through a save or a shot that goes wide and is backed up by the defense.

High School

Upon gaining possession of the ball inside the defensive half of the field, a team shall advance the ball beyond the center line within 20 seconds. Failure to do so will result in a turnover, and the ball will be awarded to the opposing team at the spot of the violation. 2019 NFHS

Things to Note:

  • College and High School rules are different.
  • We will tag a successful clear unless it’s clear that an unsuccessful clear is called.
  • Analysts do not tag possession.
  • The NCAA does not define attack possessions.
  • Currently, we only tag possessions as attacking after a successful clear is tagged and a face-off won.

Power Plays


Man Up/Down

Anytime a team is playing one or more men short or extra counts as an extra-man opportunity on defense or offense.

Things to Note:

  • If both teams are equal on the field but short of men (for example, each team a man down), it is not an extra-man offense or defense opportunity.
  • Certain penalties will automatically start a power play (man up/down) situation.
  • Due to the camera angle and quality penalties or a penalty release may be missed.

Turnovers


Turnovers

Turnovers occur when a player or team in possession of the ball or entitled to possession of the ball loses possession of it, in a live-ball situation or under certain dead-ball situations.

Forced Turnovers

A caused turnover is credited to a player when the player’s positive, aggressive action(s) causes a turnover by the opponent.

Unforced Turnovers

Turnovers occur when a player or team in possession of the ball or entitled to possession of the ball loses possession of it, in a live-ball situation or under certain dead-ball situations.

Things to Note:

  • If a single player is judged to be primarily responsible for the turnover, that player is charged with the turnover. If no single player can be judged to be primarily responsible for the turnover, or if the responsibility rests with anyone not a player, then the team is charged with the turnover
  • Due to the video angle/quality turnovers may be missed.
  • Due to video angle/quality forced turnovers may be tagged as “unknown athletes”.

Fouls and Penalties


Personal Foul

Personal fouls are those of a serious nature: illegal body checking, slashing, cross-checking, tripping, unnecessary roughness, unsportsmanlike conduct, and the use of an illegal cross or other illegal equipment.

Technical Foul

Technical fouls are those of a less serious nature than personal fouls and include all violations of the rules of the game except those specifically listed as personal or expulsion fouls.

Things to Note:

  • The penalty for a personal foul shall be suspension from the game of the offending player for one, two or three minutes, depending on the official’s judgment.
  • The penalty for a technical foul shall be either a 30-second suspension of the offending player from the game (if the team fouled had possession of the ball at the time the foul was committed) or simply the awarding of the ball to the team fouled.
  • Due to video angle/quality fouls may be missed or miss-marked.

Shot Clock Violation

An 80-second visible shot clock is required for use in all games… If the shot clock expires without a shot on goal, the ball is awarded to the defensive team. A shot must be taken at or above the goal line extended to satisfy the criteria. A shot taken from behind the goal line extended does not satisfy these criteria, unless that shot results in a goal.

Things to Note:

  • Due to video angle or quality, shot clock violations may not be seen.

Crease Violation

If an offensive player steps in the crease with the ball in his stick and possession is awarded to the defensive team, credit the offensive player with a turnover. If, in the statistician’s opinion, one player on the defense was directly responsible for making the offensive player step in the crease, credit that defensive player with a caused turnover.

Things to Note:

  • Due to video angle/quality crease violation may not be seen.