Zero Grav­i­ty CEO Sees Video as a Game Chang­er in Club Culture

Zero Grav­i­ty CEO Greg Kristof knows where the future of club bas­ket­ball is head­ed and the major role Hudl is play­ing in the movement.

Zero Grav­i­ty CEO Sees Video as a Game Chang­er in Club Culture

Zero Grav­i­ty CEO Greg Kristof knows where the future of club bas­ket­ball is head­ed and the major role Hudl is play­ing in the movement.

Few indi­vid­u­als are as well-versed in club bas­ket­ball cul­ture as Greg Kristof. As the CEO of Zero Grav­i­ty Bas­ket­ball, an orga­ni­za­tion that puts on more than 150 tour­na­ments a year in 19 states, Kristof has seen and heard just about every­thing clubs do to make their teams stand out and get play­ers recruited.

One recent trend has cer­tain­ly caught his atten­tion — more and more teams are imple­ment­ing Hudl. It’s now to the point where Kristof can tell which teams are using video to improve and which aren’t.

You can see the dif­fer­ence in the clubs that improve through March and July. They’re the ones that are doing this,” he said. You can see their improve­ment over the arc of a sea­son. Teams that we might see four, five, six times dur­ing a sea­son, you can see them get­ting bet­ter month by month by hav­ing cor­rect coach­ing feedback. 

And the coach­es that use Hudl are the ones that care the most. They’re putting in that effort to make sure their kids are get­ting bet­ter and learning.”

Kristof sees two main ways Hudl is becom­ing an inte­gral part of the club way of life. First is play­er devel­op­ment, which is often a tricky task to han­dle giv­en the severe time con­straints coach­es have with their ath­letes. Club teams typ­i­cal­ly prac­tice just once or twice a week, and the fren­zied sched­ule dur­ing tour­na­ment play lim­its the time ath­letes have to learn.

Hudl helps coach­es find pock­ets of time to pre­pare their team. 

Let’s say there’s some­thing in a game as a coach. You can break it down and have a team meet­ing in the hotel room after your games and address it and get ready for the next day,” Kristof said. You need to find a way to get instant feed­back to your play­ers. Hudl does a phe­nom­e­nal job of that. The effi­cien­cy of the tech­nol­o­gy allows grass­roots coach­es to get their play­ers bet­ter on the road. That’s unique.”

Once play­ers devel­op and improve, they need a way to get their skills in front of col­lege coach­es. Hudl pro­vides sim­ple and effi­cient tools for ath­letes and par­ents to cre­ate high­lights, catch the eyes of recruiters and cre­ate schol­ar­ship oppor­tu­ni­ties.

Kids now are look­ing at schools not just region­al­ly, but nation­al­ly, and it’s so much eas­i­er to con­nect with coach­es at Divi­sion I, II and III lev­els all over the place and find­ing their school,” Kristof said. Every col­lege bas­ket­ball coach has a tablet, a lap­top, a smart­phone. They want to see high­light films before they watch full video, and Hudl gives that to them very eas­i­ly and very effec­tive­ly.”

Kristof sees play­ers and par­ents tak­ing note of which clubs strong­ly pro­mote their play­ers and which don’t. The clubs and teams with strong devel­op­ment pro­grams, the ones that pump up their play­ers on social media, are the ones attract­ing top tal­ent. He believes this trend will only get stronger.

Grass­roots bas­ket­ball is chang­ing. It’s becom­ing more about the future and it’s becom­ing more com­pet­i­tive,” Kristof said. Hav­ing video is going to go from a com­pet­i­tive advan­tage to the norm pret­ty soon just to keep up, and right now Hudl is the leader in the space because of the tech­nol­o­gy and the sim­plic­i­ty of the non-tech per­son to use it.”

Don’t fall behind. Ensure your club has the best tools at its dis­pos­al and take advan­tage of Hudl.