No Sense of Overload: Youth Football Players Embrace Video

The Milford Eagles’ pre­vi­ous coach thought video would over­whelm the play­ers. Daniel Paul extin­guished that thought right off the bat.

No Sense of Overload: Youth Football Players Embrace Video

The Milford Eagles’ pre­vi­ous coach thought video would over­whelm the play­ers. Daniel Paul extin­guished that thought right off the bat.

A few years back Dan Paul watched his son Gavin toil on the Milford Eagles Junior Pee Wee Team of the Connecticut Pop Warner League. The squad won just once as the coach declined to incor­po­rate video study into his game planning.

Paul plead­ed for him to use video, but the coach feared it would over­whelm the play­ers and have them think­ing too much.

The next sea­son Gavin moved up to the Junior Midgets team and Dan took over as coach. He imple­ment­ed Hudl and though the Eagles went 2 – 6, they showed marked improvement.

The switch to Hudl tru­ly paid off last sea­son as the Eagles fin­ished 7 – 1, win­ning their divi­sion and tak­ing home the Connecticut Pop Warner State Championship. 

I feel it gave my teams a huge advan­tage over oth­er teams that weren’t using it,” Paul said. It helped the play­ers under­stand what we were doing and where we need­ed to make cor­rec­tions. We also had the scout film up on the site so they knew what the oth­er team was run­ning. Often the defense knew the play before the ball was snapped. We knew the oppos­ing offense bet­ter than they did.”

I would high­ly rec­om­mend Hudl to any coach at any lev­el. If you’re not using it, your oppo­si­tion will be.” Daniel Paul

Comprised of 25 play­ers 11 – 13 years old, the Eagles uti­lize Hudl in a num­ber of ways. Paul scout­ed each oppo­nent — some sev­er­al times — before draft­ing up his game plan.

The Eagles also reviewed their own games, cor­rect­ing mis­takes and reward­ing the play­ers for plays on which they per­formed well. Paul typ­i­cal­ly uploads video with­in a day or two of a week­end game and asks the play­ers to watch it by prac­tice on Monday or Tuesday. The coach will sly­ly drop in a fact, such as his favorite col­or, into the mid­dle of the film. Players are then asked to recall this bit of triv­ia at prac­tice, and are giv­en extra work if they can’t.

We are able to actu­al­ly watch the games in slow motion and see where the play­ers are and if they are in a cor­rect posi­tion to make a tack­le or block and be able to cor­rect it at a prac­tice,” Paul said. When we’re cor­rect­ing a pos­ture or move­ment and the play­ers want to argue they are already doing it cor­rect­ly, we often refer then to a spe­cif­ic sec­tion of film and have them see it for themselves.”

This also alle­vi­ates some injury risks. By break­ing down tech­nique frame-by-frame, Paul and his staff can show play­ers how to tack­le cor­rect­ly or how to avoid a big shot.

Paul became such a fan of Hudl that he advo­cat­ed for his entire league to adopt it. He believes the prod­uct helps teach young play­ers exact­ly what they’re sup­posed to be doing on the field, and that’s a tool every team should have access to.

The fea­tures and the abil­i­ty it gave us was well worth the price,” Paul said. I would pay for the whole thing myself, I nev­er asked for any­thing from the par­ents or coach­es. I loved the prod­uct and want­ed the play­ers to just get better.”

Check out what Hudl can do for your youth ath­letes by click­ing here.