Success Beyond Your Record

More detailed statistics like turnovers and shooting percentages can help paint a better picture of how a game went down, but there’s something else to consider as you reflect on the season or gear up for a new one. It’s growth - and not just as a team, but individually.

Success Beyond Your Record

More detailed statistics like turnovers and shooting percentages can help paint a better picture of how a game went down, but there’s something else to consider as you reflect on the season or gear up for a new one. It’s growth - and not just as a team, but individually.

It’s easy for coaches to look at a season and only see the wins and losses. While we know how important winning is, a team’s record isn’t always representative of its real success.

Think about it: How your team showed up for a loss by a buzzer-beater is totally different than their effort in a blowout, but that L on a record doesn’t say as much. Pulling off the Hail Mary is invigorating, but that W might not tell the whole story. More detailed statistics like turnovers and shooting percentages can help paint a better picture of how a game went down, but there’s something else to consider as you reflect on the season or gear up for a new one. It’s growth - and not just as a team, but individually.

The tricky thing about growth is measuring it. Sometimes an athlete puts in the work and attacks every game harder, faster and stronger, but not always, which makes keeping tabs even trickier. More often, the improvements of individuals are subtle, and over the course of a season, it’s easy to forget where they started.

One of the simplest ways to approach individual performance is with video, which is why we’re so pumped about Hudl Technique.

Teach with technique

Hudl Technique allows coaches to record athlete performance and instantly share that video with their players. Coaches can use slow motion playback to hone in on the exact part of an athlete’s technique that needs adjusting, and even compare a player’s form to a pro’s.

The opportunity to compare a quarterback’s throwing motion side-by-side with a pro player’s, or the ability to pinpoint the teachable moment in any video is a valuable tool. If you find yourself repeating the same correction to an athlete multiple times, perhaps what they’d really benefit from is seeing it for themselves. Teaching athletes with video that makes sense to them (they’re the ones in it, after all) can make significant improvements easier to come by. It’s never too late to break a bad habit or take your game to the next level.

Track with technique

Using video can be helpful to coaches and athletes on the spot, but it also creates a big opportunity to track individual improvement over time.

Say you record your pitcher’s release just once during every preseason practice. By the time you’re halfway through the season, it’s easy to compare his technique now to where he started. Even if you only recorded during games, looking back at his first appearance of the year when you’re playoff-bound can be a great reminder of just how much a player has improved.

Not every season can be a winning one, but that doesn’t mean your players aren’t making major strides — and hey, even in an undefeated season there’s plenty to learn. Record your athletes as they improve now, and see just how far they’ve come later - because there’s more to a successful season than the stats.

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