Basketball

Hudl Assist: Helping Coaches Kiss Late Nights Goodbye

<p>Assist made sleepless nights a thing of the past for one assistant coach.</p>

The youngest member of the basketball staff at Angola High School (Ind.), assistant Adam Tuttle grew accustomed to late nights over the past couple of years. The low man on the totem pole, he was tasked with uploading the Hornets’ video to Hudl after games, leading to the following routine:

  • Get home around 10 p.m.
  • Upload the video.
  • Set an alarm and catch as much sleep as possible.
  • Wake up and break down the video.

That schedule became a thing of the past last season. Angola got hooked up with Hudl Assist, which uses professional analysts to break down coaches’ video. Now Tuttle could catch up on some much-needed sleep while Angola benefited from an additional scouting tool.

“I could go for hours on how Hudl Assist just completely changed the game,” Tuttle said. “It took such a big burden off of my shoulders.

“With Hudl Assist I save so much time. I was able to scout so many more games. There was no way I could break scout film down because I was so busy tagging my game. Just having the ability to send my game to somebody and for it to come back accurate, I could go through our next opponent. That was the biggest game-changer of the whole year."

Insights gained from Tuttle’s work helped Angola finish 25-3 last season as the Hornets built one of the top defenses in the state. Angola allowed just 36.8 points per game, only allowing its opponent to top 50 points twice.

Hudl’s reports allowed Tuttle to maximize his lineups. Instead of simply depending on his tallest players to lead the team in rebounding, Tuttle realized that some of his smaller players were in fact better on the boards. Much like Dennis Rodman and Ben Wallace in the NBA, their knowledge of positioning and sense of timing helped them overcome their lack of height.

“You might look at them and say, ‘Duh, that kid is 6-foot-5, he should be my best rebounder,’” Tuttle said. “Sometimes the height and the weight can be a little deceiving. (The stats) make our coaching staff more confident in what we’re doing and where we need to put players."

Assist also helped Angola in the game’s tightest moments. The Hornets’ staff not only looked at its players shooting stats, but sorted them by quarter. When the pressure-packed fourth period arrived, the coaches played the guys that wouldn’t wilt under pressure – at least according to the numbers.

“You can really, really see who’s shooting free throws drastically worse at the end of the game,” Tuttle said. “We actually changed around our lineups at the end of the game based on that."

The Hornets’ success has led to a groundswell of excitement for the coming season. Football is now in swing, but fans are already looking forward to hoops season - a far cry from how things went in years past.

“People are coming up to us and saying, ‘Are you ready for basketball?’ That was never the case a few years ago,” Tuttle said. “We’re hoping for big things from the guys, and Hudl has definitely helped us out."

Need to hear more? See the power of Assist for yourself.